GETTING READY FOR
YOUR HOME VISIT
CATS
 
 
 
Things that you will need:
 
•  Dishes
 
•  Litter
 
•  Cat toys
 
•  Purina Kitten Chow (kittens)
 
•  Purina Cat Chow (adults)
 
•  Litterbox - 1.5 boxes per cat
 
•  Litter Scoop
 
 
 
Things that will give to you to start you off:
 
•  3 day supply of food currently being used
 
 
 
Things to think about:
 
•  Dewclaw surgery (additional fee)
 
•  Yesterday's News Litter for declaw after surgery (BiLo)
 
•  Extra worming (if needed)
 
•  Flea protection
 
•  Quiet place to introduce & after surgery
 
•  Crate
 
 
 
We can loan you (if available) or you can purchase the following items:
 
•  Carrier
 
•  Crate (set up equipment)
 


Paws Along the River
212 Elm Street • Warren, PA 16365 • (814) 726-1961
www.pawsalongtheriver.org
 
Things to Consider before Adoption
Male or
Female
This may be a consideration if you already have a pet.
Children Children must be a critical component in your decision.
Hair/
Allergies
Consider the hair and shedding issues with this new pet.
Money Do you have the financial means to properly care for a pet.
Declaw or Not to Declaw
What is declawing?

Declawing is a surgical procedure which is normally done to solve the common behavioral problem of destructive scratching or aggressive play. When a cat is declawed, the digit of the toe is amputated, which removes not only the claw, but also the claw root. In humans this would be the same as removing the top of each finger down to th first joint.
What are the benefits of declawing?

The owner benefits as there are no more scratched furniture, clothing or skin. The only benefit to the cat is that it doesn't lose its home.
What are other options instead of declawing?

Cats can be trained to claw only on approved items such as scratching posts or mats. Eliminate rough play. Trimming the cat's nails on a regular basis will help eliminate scratching. A newer alternative is to buy rubber tips which fit over the nails.
Adult or Kitten
Adult cats are the best-ket secret of cat ownership. Most adult cats bond quickly to their new homes. Adult cats can arrive in your home with little or no adjustment period. Kittens can be a lot of fun, however do require a considerable amount of time and patience to be trained.